RACIAL PROFILING

"When you are checked in public, it creates a really unpleasant image. I wonder what the passers-by think – whether they really think that I committed a crime or that I really did something illegal – especially when it occurs in the neighborhood where I work...An example that I find particularly striking is when I walk down the street and I pass someone who shifts their bag to the other side – there is no mystery. I also try not to go to stores on Saturdays as I will likely be followed and checked." - Omer Mas Capitolin, elected official, Paris, France. Photo by Ed Kashi

“When you are checked in public, it creates a really unpleasant image. I wonder what the passers-by think – whether they really think that I committed a crime or that I really did something illegal – especially when it occurs in the neighborhood where I work…An example that I find particularly striking is when I walk down the street and I pass someone who shifts their bag to the other side – there is no mystery. I also try not to go to stores on Saturdays as I will likely be followed and checked.” – Omer Mas Capitolin, elected official, Paris, France. Photo by Ed Kashi

These images and testimonies explore police profiling in three European countries: The Netherlands, France, and the United Kingdom. Through portraits and interviews, Ed Kashi examines the impact felt by immigrants and minorities who must contend with the stigma, legal pressures and exclusion from society that these practices cause for victims of such policies and behavior.

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