Hunters

Xhosa huntsman with lynx. south Africa, from the series hunters. Photo by David Chancellor

Xhosa huntsman with lynx. south Africa, from the series hunters. Photo by David Chancellor

This series of portraits is part of an ongoing project documenting the game hunting industry in Sub Saharan Africa. During the early 20th century, the tourist trophy hunting industry started in Kenya, wealthy European and American visitors paid settler farmers to guide them on hunting safaris in the area. Similar tourist hunting industries soon developed elsewhere in Africa.

During the 1980s and 1990s, the potential for tourist hunting to create financial incentives for conservation was increasingly recognized and in several nations there was a gradual alignment of trophy hunting with conservation and development programmes. Well known examples of this include the Communal Areas Management Programme for Indigenous Resources (CAMPFIRE) programme in Zimbabwe. Trophy hunting is now a major industry in Africa occurring in 23 sub Saharan African countries, and generates in excess of USD 201 million/year from +/- 18500 international hunting clients. Approximately 1.4 million km2 is used for trophy hunting, which is an area 22% larger than, and in addition to the area encompassed by all the national parks (ie. Protected areas where hunting is not permitted). South Africa has the largest hunting industry. There are also well developed hunting industries in Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia, and to a lesser extent Zambia, Mozambique and Swaziland. The southern African hunting industry has grown during recent years due partly to a major increase in game ranching in place of traditional livestock farming.

South Africa has the largest hunting industry. There are also well developed hunting industries in Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia, and to a lesser extent Zambia, Mozambique and Swaziland. The southern African hunting industry has grown during recent years due partly to a major increase in game ranching in place of traditional livestock farming.

Hunters and hunting advocates insist that trophy hunting is of major importance for conservation in Africa. However, animal rights groups fundamentally oppose hunting and there is a lack of consensus among conservationists regarding the acceptability and efficacy of hunting as a conservation tool …

Winner of the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize 2010.

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